Depression is a memory

It’s blindingly obvious (when you think about it): depression is the result of events that have happened in our life.  It’s not caused by our genes or by some chemical imbalance in the brain—it’s caused by the memory of difficult, traumatic, life-altering experiences. Psychologists have finally admitted this week that this is, by far, the over-riding cause of depression, and research funding on seeking out a genetic cause should be stopped. I could say the same for the billions spent on antidepressants, which are supposed to correct a chemical imbalance—a dubious theory that has never been proven, and, indeed, has
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True transformation

It’s been called ‘therapy wars’: the Freudian psychoanalysts have been trying to win back ground taken by the newer upstart, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), which has become the standard treatment for everything from anxiety and depression to procrastination. CBT is considered by its detractors to be something of a quick fix, and one that is overly simplistic.  Unhappiness, for example, is caused by irrational beliefs, and once we see those beliefs for what they are, they disappear, and we’re happy. The Freudians argue that things aren’t that easy: you can’t escape your past without a great deal more insight and
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What John’s death can teach us

John, an old friend and work colleague, died the other day.  Only he knows what death is, and what is beyond our death, because he has joined the millions before him who have made that journey.  For us, death is the greatest mystery: it takes away someone who had been a son or daughter, a husband or wife, with all the experiences of their life, and the quirkiness of their personality, their traits, habits, their ways and demeanour, their little kindnesses. All gone, in the twinkling of an eye. So what has happened?  We know that the body and form
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